About Jakim

HISTORY OF JAKIM
In 1968, the Malaysian Council of Rulers decided that there was a need for a body that could mobilise the development and progress of Muslims in Malaysia, in line with the country’s status as an Islamic country which was growing in strength as well as fast gaining worldwide recognition. In realising the fact, a secretariat for the National Council of Islamic Affairs of Malaysia was formed to protect the purity of faith and the teachings of Islam. This secretariat was later expanded to become the Religious Division, Prime Minister’s Department which was later upgraded to become the Islamic Affairs Division (BAHEIS).
 
On 1st January 1997, in line with the country’s steadfast Islamic development and progress, the Department of Islamic Development Malaysia (JAKIM) was established by the Government of Malaysia to take over the role of BAHEIS.
 
BACKGROUND ON THE ESTABLISHMENT OF ISLAMIC CENTRE
The Malaysian Islamic Centre Complex, which stands proud and majestic in the heart of Kuala Lumpur city, has a history which started since the National Mosque.
 
The National Mosque, which was officially opened in 1965 by the Third Duli Yang Maha Mulia Seri Paduka Baginda Yang Di Pertuan Agong Tuanku Syed Putra Ibni Al-Marhum Syed Hassan Jamalulail, was the foundation for all activities leading to the building of the present Islamic Centre Complex.
 
The Islamic Affairs Division, Prime Minister’s Department is the new name given to the Religious Division, Prime Minister’s Department.
 
In the beginning, this division used to be a secretariat in the Prime Minister’s Department. This secretariat was called the Secretariat of the National Council for Islamic Religious Affairs of Malaysia and was formed by the Council of Rulers in 1968.
 
Its first chairman was the Yang Teramat Mulia Tunku Abdul Rahman Putra Al-Haj, the Prime Minister at that time, while its secretary was Dato' Haji Ismail bin Panjang Aris. At first, it was hoped that all the states in Malaysia would enlist. However, during its establishment, two states did not become a member of the National Council for Islamic Religious Affairs of Malaysia. The two states were Kedah and Pahang. To date, the two states have yet to join the National Council for Islamic Religious Affairs of Malaysia.
 
There are two important tasks given to the National Council for Islamic Religious Affairs of Malaysia and they are:-
  1. To discuss, consider and manage any matters referred to the Council of Rulers, any State Government or State Islamic Religious Affairs Council or a Council member, with the purpose of providing advices or recommendations.
  2. To advise the Council of Rulers, State Governments or State Islamic Religious Affairs Council on matters relating to Islamic legislation or administration or education with the objectives to improve, standardise or enhance the legislation or administration.
Since its inception until today, the Chairman of the Islamic Religious Affairs Council has always been the Prime Minister of Malaysia, in line with the importance of Islam in the Malaysian National Constitution. This council is important not only because it has served as a coordinator, but also because it has become the highest religious forum to discuss and solve religious issues that have big impact to the religion and its followers in the country.
 
Within the first 10 years (1970-1980), more than 20 conferences were held by the National Council for Islamic Religious Affairs of Malaysia and almost 200 issues were discussed. In these conferences, various decisions were discussed and resolved. One of the successes of the National Council for Islamic Religious Affairs of Malaysia was creating Islamic Institutions which had significant impacts to the development of Islam at the national and international levels.
Among the new Institutions created are:
  1. Islamic Da’wah and Training Institute (INDAH)
  2. Malaysian Da’wah Islamiah Foundation
  3. Malaysian Islamic Teaching College
  4. Religious Secondary Schools in Sarawak
  5. Islamic Research Centre
  6. Maahad Tahfiz al-Quran Wal Qiraat
  7. Board of Education and Islamic Teaching Coordination (LEPAI)                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  
 
A part of these institutions play an integral part in the Islamic Affairs Division in the Prime Minister’s Department today. These institutions have already become a reality and have grown rapidly under the tower of the new Malaysian Islamic Centre.
 
Physical Development of the Islamic Centre
The Secretariat of the National Council for Islamic Religious Affairs of Malaysia commenced its duties in 1970 when the National Council for Islamic Religious Affairs of Malaysia established the Islamic Research Centre (PPI) in 1971 and the Islamic Da’wah and Training Institute (INDAH) in 1974.
 
When the Federal Territory was formed in 1974, the Secretariat of the National Council for Islamic Religious Affairs’ status was upgraded to become the Religious Department, Prime Minister’s Department. The Federal Territory Islamic Religious Council was placed under the administration of the Religious Department, Prime Minister’s Department until 1978. After that, the Federal Territory Islamic Religious Council was placed under the Federal Territory Ministry and became a department known as the Federal Territory Islamic Affairs Department (JAWI).
 
Looking at the fast-paced development of Islam in Malaysia, there was a need for the Islamic administration to have its own building. In its early days of operations, the Secretariat of the National Council for Islamic Religious Affairs operated from a temporary office at the Tunku Abdul Rahman Hall, Jalan Ampang, Kuala Lumpur, while all religious activities were held at the National Mosque.
 
In 1970, the old Islamic Centre building situated at Jalan Lembah near the National Mosque was built. The placing of the foundation stone was performed by the Yang Amat Berhormat Prime Minister Tun Abdul Razak bin Dato’ Hussein.
 
In 1974, when the Secretariat of the National Council for Islamic Religious Affairs was upgraded to become Religious Division, Prime Minister’s Department, its duties and responsibilities became bigger and much more challenging. New branch centres were established and placed under the jurisdiction of the Religious Division, Prime Minister’s Department. At the time, the Islamic Research Centre (1971), the Da’wah and Islamic Training Institute (1974) as well as Maahad Tahfiz and the Federal Territory Islamic Affairs Council had already been established.
 
With its rapid development, the number of officers as well as activities and programmes has increased, and the office space became crowded. Towards early 1980s, the Religious Division, Prime Minister’s Department had undergone a rapid development pace. During that time, the Religious Division’s branches were scattered around Kuala Lumpur such as the Islamic Research Centre in the Government Offices Complex, Jalan Duta while the Da’wah and Islamic Training Institute was located at the Islamic Centre, Jalan Lembah and at the Government quarters in Jalan Mahameru and Jalan Cenderasari, as well as the Maahad Tahfiz al-Quran Wal Qiraat building.
 
Under the Third Malaysia Plan (1976-80) the Religious Division, Prime Minister’s Department received allocations to build a 4-storey building for the offices of Ministers without Portfolios, in the Prime Minister’s Department and the Islamic Centre’s New Complex. However, the project could not be implemented under the Third Malaysia Plan and was subsequently brought forward to the Fourth Malaysia Plan.
 
 
 
ISLAMIC AFFAIRS DIVISION, PRIME MINISTER’S DEPARTMENT
In 1984, the Religious Division, Prime Minister’s Department was re-structured and expanded. All existing positions were upgraded. On 1st Ramadhan 1405 or 21st May 1985, the Religious Division was re-named the Islamic Affairs Division, Prime Minister’s Department.
 
In the same year, the Islamic Affairs Division, Prime Minister’s Department moved to a new building. This complex was built on a 2.43-hectare land near the National Mosque costing RM58 million. The complex consists of an 11-storey tower which houses various offices, lecture halls and an auditorium that can accommodate 1,500 people. The complex also has a 3-storey building that houses the Islamic Public Library, the Islamic Exhibition Hall and the Al-Quran Wal Qiraat Institute of Learning. This Islamic Affairs Division complex is known as the Malaysian Islamic Centre.
 
 
DESIGN CONCEPT
The Islamic Centre Complex has a unique and interesting design which is based on Islamic architecture. The main aspect taken into account in its design was to create a balance between the physiques of the building and its requirements.
 
The design was created by Y.Bhg Datuk Nik Mohamed bin Mahmud from Kumpulan Senireka Sdn Bhd. This complex was designed like a castle surrounded by concrete walls and two main entrances. Between the walls and the main building is a courtyard which can accommodate 6,000 people.
 
This concept was well-known during the glorious era of ancient Islam. The spaces between the walls and building and the courtyard can be used as a place to gather, confer and discuss specifically issues related to religious matters.
 
 
STRUCTURE OF THE ISLAMIC AFFAIRS DIVISION, PRIME MINISTER’S DEPARTMENT
In order to implement its duties and responsibilities, the organisation of the Islamic Affairs Division, Prime Minister’s Department was arranged into several branches as per the following chart:
 
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FUNCTIONS OF THE ISLAMIC AFFAIRS DIVISION
The Islamic Affairs Division was given the responsibility to implement a programme under the Prime Minister’s Department which is the Islamic Affairs Administration.  The tasks cover all duties of planning and coordinating bodies and can be summarised below:-
  1. Efforts to improve and standardise the legal and administrative aspects relating to Islamic affairs, laws and education within the country.
  2. Islamic activities to ensure that the policies and national development plans are smoothly implemented.
  3. Da’wah Islamiahprogrammes and activities.
  4. Programmes and activities for the implementation of the Islamic Absorption Values into Administration Policy.
  5. Islamic programmes and activities in Federal Government Department and Statutory Bodies.
  6. Efforts to contribute towards the enhancement and strengthening of the position of Islam and its followers in Malaysia.
  7. Efforts to control and maintain the purity of faith and the teachings of Islamin the country.
  8. Efforts to solve the problems of the ummah that are related to current issues.
  9. Evaluate and provide recommendations on Islamic activities that are implemented by the Government and private agencies to ensure there are no conflicts between national and Islamic interests.
  10. Plan activities to assist the state Islamic authorities in the da’wah islamiah field.
OBJECTIVES
The objectives of the Islamic Affairs Administration are as follows:-
 
To ensure that the development plans for the ummah and the development of Islam in the country is implemented in an integrated manner based on effective plans and coordination.”
 
From a wider perspective, the Islamic Affairs Division (BAHEIS) has two main objectives:-
  1. To coordinate the Islamic Affairs administration in Malaysia, of which its main role is implemented by the State Islamic Division and Council.
  2. To create an integrated Islamic Affairs administration through effective planning, coordination and implementation.
 
JOB DESCRIPTION
In order to achieve those objectives, the Islamic Affairs Division, Prime Minister’s Department has reorganised the division into the following branches:-
  • Administration and Coordination
  • Islamic Research Centre
  • Islamic Da’wah & Training Institute (INDAH)
  • Tahfiz al-Quran Wal QiraatInstitute
  • Coordinating Board of Islamic Education
  • Publication
  • National Mosque
  • Secretariat 1
  • Secretariat 2
  • Islamic Affairs Division, Sabah Branch
  • Islamic Affairs Division, Sarawak Branch
  • Islamic Information System
  • Special Da’wah for the Aborigines
 
ADMINISTRATION AND COORDINATION
The Administration and Coordination Branch is responsible for managing six main tasks as follows:
  1. General Administration
  2. Financial Development Management
  3. Personnel Management
  4. Training and Career
  5. Islamic Public Library
  6. Islamic Exhibition Hall
 
The functions of the branch are:
  1. Implementing the general administration, personnel administration, financial management, training and career matters.
  2. Managing the services of the Islamic Public Library and Islamic Exhibition Hall
  3. Managing the Tilawah al-Quran events and seminars organised by the Islamic Affairs Division.
  4. Managing development projects.